Fact Friday: Endometriosis

October 30, 2015 Katie A Chronic Illness, personal: fact friday, personal: health, personal: that spoonie life 0 Comments

I guess I’m on a roll for these new features, but it’s fun and something to focus on when I have nothing else to do.

This week I wanted to give a quick, five fact breakdown for one of my biggest health challenges – endometriosis.

  1. MayoClinic describes endometriosis as:

Endometriosis (en-doe-me-tree-O-sis) is an often painful disorder in which tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus (endometrial implant). Endometriosis most commonly involves your ovaries, bowel or the tissue lining your pelvis. Rarely, endometrial tissue may spread beyond your pelvic region.

In endometriosis, displaced endometrial tissue continues to act as it normally would — it thickens, breaks down and bleeds with each menstrual cycle. Because this displaced tissue has no way to exit your body, it becomes trapped. When endometriosis involves the ovaries, cysts called endometriomas may form. Surrounding tissue can become irritated, eventually developing scar tissue and adhesions — abnormal tissue that binds organs together.

Endometriosis can cause pain — sometimes severe — especially during your period. Fertility problems also may develop. Fortunately, effective treatments are available.

2.There is NO CURE for endometriosis. Yep, you heard me. NO. CURE. That means this condition will never go away. There are treatments for it (and I’ve tried several) but as with any medication or treatment approach – what may work for you, may not work for me.

3. The biggest symptom and indicator many women have is:

The primary symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain, often associated with your menstrual period. Although many women experience cramping during their menstrual period, women with endometriosis typically describe menstrual pain that’s far worse than usual. They also tend to report that the pain has increased over time. 

4. I deal with the pain by pain medication, rest, hot baths or heating pads. No, this doesn’t always help. Sometimes it brings enough relief that I can get some rest, but lately – that’s impossible. I’ve had several doctor appointments and several ER trips this past summer because my symptoms have only worsened.

5. The most effective treatment for me? Has been my first and only surgery. I had a laparoscopy done about eight years ago and what endometriosis was found was removed and I had quite a bit of relief for awhile. Now that it’s been several years, my symptoms are worse – right back to where they were before my operation. I’m hoping that I’ll be able to have another soon so that I can have somewhat of a normal life.

If you have any other questions, don’t hesitate to ask! Hopefully this post has helped explain some of what I go through with endo.

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